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FSBO’s MUST BE READY TO NEGOTIATE

If you view all the things that happen to you, both good and bad, as opportunities, then you operate out of a higher level of consciousness.”~ Les Brown

FSBO’s Must Be Ready to Negotiate | Keeping Current Matters

Now that the market has showed signs of recovery, some sellers may be tempted to try and sell their home on their own (FSBO) without using the services of a real estate professional.

Real estate agents are trained and experienced in negotiation. In most cases, the seller is not. The seller must realize their ability to negotiate will determine whether they can get the best deal for themselves and their family.

Here is a list of some of the people with whom the seller must be prepared to negotiate if they decide to FSBO:

  • The buyer who wants the best deal possible
  • The buyer’s agent who solely represents the best interest of the buyer
  • The buyer’s attorney (in some parts of the country)
  • The home inspection companies which work for the buyer and will almost always find some problems with the house.
  • The termite company if there are challenges
  • The buyer’s lender if the structure of the mortgage requires the sellers’ participation
  • The appraiser if there is a question of value
  • The title company if there are challenges with certificates of occupancy (CO) or other permits
  • The town or municipality if you need to get the COs permits mentioned above
  • The buyer’s buyer in case there are challenges on the house your buyer is selling.
  • Your bank in the case of a short sale

Bottom Line

The percentage of sellers who have hired a real estate agent to sell their home has increased steadily over the last 20 years. Meet with a professional in your local market to see the difference they can make in easing the process.

HOME OWNERSHIP RATES: ARE THEY CRASHING?

“You can make all the excuses you want, but if you are not mentally tough, and you’re not prepared to play every night, you’re not going to win. “ ~ Larry Bird

 

Homeownership Rates: Are They Crashing? | Keeping Current Matters

The Census recently released their 2014 Home ownership Statistics, and many began to worry that Americans have taken a step back from the notion of home ownership.

Easy… Chicken Little

The national homeownership rate peaked in 2004, representing a 69.2% of Americans who bought vs. rented their primary residence. Many have noticed a decline in rates since then and taken that as a bad sign.

However, if you look at the national rate over the last 30 years (1984-2014), you can see that the current homeownership rate has returned closer to the historic norm. 2014 ended the year with a rate of 64% just under the rate in 1985 and 1995.

Homeownership Rates Historically | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line

With interest rates and prices still below where experts predict, evaluate your ability to purchase a home with a local real estate professional.

FIELDING A LOW BALL OFFER ON YOUR HOME

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” ~ Winston Churchill

pitcher

Consider before you ignore or outright refuse a very low purchase offer for your home. A counter offer and negotiation could turn that low purchase offer into a sale.

You just received a purchase offer from someone who wants to buy your home. You’re excited and relieved, until you realize the purchase offer is much lower than your asking price. How should you respond? Set aside your emotions, focus on the facts, and prepare a counter offer that keeps the buyers involved in the deal.

Check your emotions.

A purchase offer, even a very low one, means someone wants to purchase your home. Unless the offer is laughably low, it deserves a cordial response, whether that’s a counter offer or an outright rejection. Remain calm and discuss with your real estate agent the many ways you can respond to a lowball purchase offer.

Counter the purchase offer.

Unless you’ve received multiple purchase offers, the best response is to counter the low offer with a price and terms you’re willing to accept. Some buyers make a low offer because they think that’s customary, they’re afraid they’ll overpay, or they want to test your limits.

A counter offer signals that you’re willing to negotiate. One strategy for your counter offer is to lower your price, but remove any concessions such as seller assistance with closing costs, or features such as kitchen appliances that you’d like to take with you.

Consider the terms.

Price is paramount for most buyers and sellers, but it’s not the only deal point. A low purchase offer might make sense if the contingencies are reasonable, the closing date meets your needs, and the buyer is pre-approved for a mortgage. Consider what terms you might change in a counteroffer to make the deal work.
Review your comps.

Ask your REALTOR® whether any homes that are comparable to yours (known as “comps”) have been sold or put on the market since your home was listed for sale. If those new comps are at lower prices, you might have to lower your price to match them if you want to sell.

Consider the buyer’s comps.

Buyers sometimes attach comps to a low offer to try to convince the seller to accept a lower purchase offer. Take a look at those comps. Are the homes similar to yours? If so, your asking price might be unrealistic. If not, you might want to include in your counter-offer information about those homes and your own comps that justify your asking price.

If the buyers don’t include comps to justify their low purchase offer, have your real estate agent ask the buyers’ agent for those comps.

Get the agents together.

If the purchase offer is too low to counter, but you don’t have a better option, ask your real estate agent to call the buyer’s agent and try to narrow the price gap so that a counter-offer would make sense. Also, ask your real estate agent whether the buyer (or buyer’s agent) has a reputation for lowball purchase offers. If that’s the case, you might feel freer to reject the offer.

Don’t signal desperation.

Buyers are sensitive to signs that a seller may be receptive to a low purchase offer. If your home is vacant or your home’s listing describes you as a “motivated” seller, you’re signaling you’re open to a low offer.

If you can remedy the situation, maybe by renting furniture or asking your agent not to mention in your home listing that you’re motivated, the next purchase offer you get might be more to your liking.

By: Marcie Geffner

Marcie Geffner is a freelance reporter who has been writing about real estate, home ownership and mortgages for 20 years. She owns a ranch-style house built in 1941 and updated in the 1990s, in Los Angeles.

WHY BUYERS AND SELLERS SHOULD USE REALTORS

home for sale Buyers need a Realtor to guide them through the process of buying a home.  Every so many years, forms are updated, rules change and lending practices change.  A buyer can’t navigate all of this alone, they need someone who is up to date on all the rule changes – that is where a Realtors come in to play.  Realtors need to take a certain amount of continuing education every year, so Realtors can remain on top of their game.

Click this link to read the 175 reasons a buyer should use a Realtor.

Sellers also need a Realtor when it comes time to sell their home.  The average person only sells a home two or three times in a lifetime.  A Realtor does it for a living and closes many transaction per month.  Wouldn’t you rather have someone who knows what they are doing than trusting your closing to just yourself and the buyer.  Check out the infographic below (from “Keeping Current Matter”)  for why you should not be a “For Sale By Owner”!

FSBO-2014

 

SO MUCH TO DO – SO LITTLE TIME

SO MUCH TO DO – SO LITTLE TIME

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?” – John Wooden

Time is the only thing that everyone has the same of – whether you are rich or poor, famous or ordinary, we all have the same amount of time to accomplish what we want to do on any given day.

This past weekend I think I may have bit off more than I wanted.  I decided to build a website to showcase all the short sales I have for sale and it pretty much took up all of my weekend.  So, I never got to post what I wanted to talk about yesterday.

Briefly, yesterday was the Epiphany – the day when the wise men – Magi – went to see the Christ child. These three men traveled a great distance just to see the newborn king and bring him gifts.  King Herod was jealous and afraid this newborn king would be greater than him, so he asked the wise men to come to his palace after they saw the Christ child, to tell him where he was so he could also pay homage to this newborn king.

An angel appeared to the Magi in a dream and told them of King Herod’s plan, and so instead of  returning the way they came – via where King Herod resided  – the Magi took a different way home.  In essence they had a “Plan B”.

Do you have a “Plan B”?  In today’s world and economy, it is very important to have a “Plan B” to keep you afloat.  If you don’t have one, I suggest you begin giving it a lot of thought. I know I am!

By the way, please stop by my new “ShortSaleAlachua.com” web site and take a look at the “Pre-Approved” short sales I have on the market. This is the website I built this weekend that took up all of my time.  Just click on the link below to view the site.  Thanks

https://sites.google.com/site/shortsalealachuacom/home

IT’S ALL IN PERSPECTIVE

IT’S ALL IN PERSPECTIVE

“A budget tells us what we can’t afford, but it doesn’t keep us from buying it.” – William Feather

When it comes to selling you home, everyone has a different perspective on what the price should be.  This is a big problem, especially for Realtors who have studied the market and different subdivisions, and are knowledgeable on the value of a home.  Sometimes there is a wide difference of opinion in pricing the home to sell, between the Realtor and the seller.  I have also found the lender, appraiser and tax assessor also have their opinions.  Following is a pictorial description of the discrepancy of these opinions.  I hope this helps eliminate any confusion current sellers may have.

YOUR HOME AS VIEWED BY….

YOURSELF, THE SELLER

YOUR LENDER

YOUR BUYER

YOUR APPRAISER

YOUR TAX ASSESSOR….

HELP!! I CAN’T SELL MY HOME – MY ADDITION WAS NEVER PERMITTED!

“An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded. ”     Pope John Paul II

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard this.  Well I have both good news and bad news.  First for the bad news.  If you decide to go the route of permitting something that has already been built, you will pay double for the permit, compared to what you would have paid in the first place.  Then you will have to hire a contractor to draw plans, do the engineering and have everything inspected.  If your addition has electricity and plumbing – and most do – you will need to remove a section of the wall to enable the electric and plumbing to be inspected.

On the other hand, let’s say for instance you hired a contractor to build your addition and later on you find out he never obtained a permit – what can you do?  You should start by contacting that contractor and requesting that he file the permits.  If he refuses, you should call the DBPR (Department of Business and Professional Regulation) in your state and file a complaint against the contractor.  This should get his attention rather quickly.

Let’s say for instance you finished off a part of your attic, which already had electric, just so you could have some extra space for storage or a place for the kids to hang out in.  All you did was hang some sheet rock, install a floor and paint. You still should have obtained a permit, but now your selling and don’t have the time to go through all that. Now for the good news: You will need to disclose the remodel on the seller’s disclosure and to you agent.  The buyers can then decide to purchase the home in spite of the addition not being permitted, taking the risk of an un-permitted addition on themselves.

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