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Category Archives: For Sale By Owner

FSBO’s MUST BE READY TO NEGOTIATE

If you view all the things that happen to you, both good and bad, as opportunities, then you operate out of a higher level of consciousness.”~ Les Brown

FSBO’s Must Be Ready to Negotiate | Keeping Current Matters

Now that the market has showed signs of recovery, some sellers may be tempted to try and sell their home on their own (FSBO) without using the services of a real estate professional.

Real estate agents are trained and experienced in negotiation. In most cases, the seller is not. The seller must realize their ability to negotiate will determine whether they can get the best deal for themselves and their family.

Here is a list of some of the people with whom the seller must be prepared to negotiate if they decide to FSBO:

  • The buyer who wants the best deal possible
  • The buyer’s agent who solely represents the best interest of the buyer
  • The buyer’s attorney (in some parts of the country)
  • The home inspection companies which work for the buyer and will almost always find some problems with the house.
  • The termite company if there are challenges
  • The buyer’s lender if the structure of the mortgage requires the sellers’ participation
  • The appraiser if there is a question of value
  • The title company if there are challenges with certificates of occupancy (CO) or other permits
  • The town or municipality if you need to get the COs permits mentioned above
  • The buyer’s buyer in case there are challenges on the house your buyer is selling.
  • Your bank in the case of a short sale

Bottom Line

The percentage of sellers who have hired a real estate agent to sell their home has increased steadily over the last 20 years. Meet with a professional in your local market to see the difference they can make in easing the process.

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3 REASONS TO LIST YOU HOME WITH A LOCAL AGENT.

3 REASONS TO LIST YOU HOME WITH A LOCAL AGENT.

“Always desire to learn something useful.Sophocles

During my daily reading, I came across this piece that I found to be good advice. Enjoy!

3 reasons to list home with a local agent.

XERISCAPING – A FUNNY WORD!

XERISCAPING – A FUNNY WORD!
“Forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair.”  – Khalil Gibran

According to Wikipedia, Xeriscaping “refers to landscaping and gardening in ways that reduce or eliminate the need for supplemental water from irrigation. It is promoted in regions that do not have easily accessible, plentiful, or reliable supplies of fresh water, and is gaining acceptance in other areas as climate patterns shift.”

Xeri, comes from the Greek “xeros,” meaning dry, and “scape,”  is a kind of view or scene. When you put the two words together you have a  landscape with slow-growing, drought-tolerant plants to conserve water and establish a waste-efficient landscape.  Xeriscaping will also reduce the high cost of your water bills and comes in very handy during the drought periods we sometimes have in Florida.

For an in-depth explanation with lots of suggestions for choosing plants please click on the following link – xeriscaping. This link will bring you to the IFAS website, which looks like a newsletter.  There is a plethora of helpful information other than gardening and landscaping.  For example, you can find helpful information on energy, water conservation, waste management, wildlife, natural history, food and other local information.

There is a home on NW 8th Avenue in Gainesville that makes use of one aspect of xeriscaping.  All the plants have been strategically planted so that the water runoff on the property goes to these plants. It is truly a zero maintenance yard in spite of the variety of plants growing there.This home sits next to Rattlesnake creek and boasts a magnificent variety of trees such as:

  • Japanese persimmon
  • grapefruit
  • Orange
  • Satsuma tangerine
  • an avocado tree from Mexico and
  • Three varieties of olive trees
    1. green olive
    2. black olive
    3. brown olive
  • a Hong Kong Orchid tree and/or Mountain Ebony
  • camellias
  • two kinds of Bougainville’s
  • Paw Paw trees, and of course
  • Saw Palmettos

If having all this fruit isn’t enough, the home itself is an architects’ delight with  2 story soaring windows in the family room, an updated kitchen, a mother-in-law suite, a loft overlooking the pool area and a free form salt water pool.

There is a ravine along the back portion of the property, where rattlesnake creek runs, which has a cross-country trail system running through it.   This ravine sustains the life of, and breeding habits of, 60 of the 65 varieties of dragon flies found in Florida.

This home has over 3000 square feet of heated and cooled living space and is located only 8 blocks from the University of Florida in Gainesville. This is not only a great home, but you can purchase it at the great price of only $219,000.00.  This is a pre-approved short sale and the home will not last long on the market. For more information about this great home, please click on the following link: MLS# 329532.

Regarding the slide show below, the smaller pictures are of the home cleaned up when someone who cared about the property was living there.  The larger pictures are of the home in its current condition.  It can very easily be restored to the way it used to look – all it needs is some elbow grease and trimming of the yard. If you would like to take a tour of this property, please call for an appointment at the numbers below.

Jocelyne Grandjean-Brown

CDPE Trained

RE/MAX Professionals

Gainesville, FL 32606

Office: 352-375-1002

Cell: 352-870-9929

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IT’S ALL IN PERSPECTIVE

IT’S ALL IN PERSPECTIVE

“A budget tells us what we can’t afford, but it doesn’t keep us from buying it.” – William Feather

When it comes to selling you home, everyone has a different perspective on what the price should be.  This is a big problem, especially for Realtors who have studied the market and different subdivisions, and are knowledgeable on the value of a home.  Sometimes there is a wide difference of opinion in pricing the home to sell, between the Realtor and the seller.  I have also found the lender, appraiser and tax assessor also have their opinions.  Following is a pictorial description of the discrepancy of these opinions.  I hope this helps eliminate any confusion current sellers may have.

YOUR HOME AS VIEWED BY….

YOURSELF, THE SELLER

YOUR LENDER

YOUR BUYER

YOUR APPRAISER

YOUR TAX ASSESSOR….

HELP!! I CAN’T SELL MY HOME – MY ADDITION WAS NEVER PERMITTED!

“An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded. ”     Pope John Paul II

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard this.  Well I have both good news and bad news.  First for the bad news.  If you decide to go the route of permitting something that has already been built, you will pay double for the permit, compared to what you would have paid in the first place.  Then you will have to hire a contractor to draw plans, do the engineering and have everything inspected.  If your addition has electricity and plumbing – and most do – you will need to remove a section of the wall to enable the electric and plumbing to be inspected.

On the other hand, let’s say for instance you hired a contractor to build your addition and later on you find out he never obtained a permit – what can you do?  You should start by contacting that contractor and requesting that he file the permits.  If he refuses, you should call the DBPR (Department of Business and Professional Regulation) in your state and file a complaint against the contractor.  This should get his attention rather quickly.

Let’s say for instance you finished off a part of your attic, which already had electric, just so you could have some extra space for storage or a place for the kids to hang out in.  All you did was hang some sheet rock, install a floor and paint. You still should have obtained a permit, but now your selling and don’t have the time to go through all that. Now for the good news: You will need to disclose the remodel on the seller’s disclosure and to you agent.  The buyers can then decide to purchase the home in spite of the addition not being permitted, taking the risk of an un-permitted addition on themselves.

CONGRATULATIONS and THANK YOU!

CONGRATULATIONS and THANK YOU!

“To move forward, a turtle must stick its neck out” – Unknown

NOTE: This special posting reflects an email Dave Liniger sent to all U.S. Associates on Wednesday, July 27:

I have extremely exciting news to share with you!

J.D. Power and Associates announced today that RE/MAX ranks highest in customer satisfaction, for both buyers and sellers, in its 2011 residential real estate survey.

That’s right – we’ve  earned the highest level of appreciation from BOTH groups of consumers, which is a remarkable statement about the Outstanding Agents in our organization.

I want to personally thank and congratulate every one of you for contributing to this prestigious recognition. It truly reflects your professional excellence, your enthusiasm for education, your commitment to distressed sellers, your individual drive, and many other qualities that serve the interests of your clients. Your efforts change lives, and those people have spoken.

Our team at Headquarters is working with J.D. Power and Associates to determine how we can use the results of the survey, as well as their name and  logo. As soon as possible, we will let you know what the guidelines are.

In the meantime, celebrate this incredible achievement and enjoy the fact that once again you’ve proven yourselves to be the best in the business.

Congratulations!

Dave

Published: 7/28/2011 12:49 PM

SAFEGUARDS FOR CONTINGENT BUYERS

SAFEGUARDS FOR CONTINGENT BUYERS

“This I do know beyond any reasonable doubt. Regardless of what you are doing, if you pump long enough, hard enough and enthusiastically enough, sooner or later the effort will bring forth the reward.”  –   Zig Ziglar

Okay, so you’ve finally decided to put your home on the market – after the holidays – and start looking for that new home. There are dozens of new model homes to tour, and several areas you are considering. Once you start marketing your home, what can you do to protect yourself against that “domino” effect if you go on contract for a new home, while considering offers on your existing one? How can you minimize your risk, the way a builder does in a new home purchase?

It’s actually a great idea to “mirror” the builder’s program for purchasing a new home by conducting the sale of your new home along the same lines. Find out how much earnest money is required by the builder, and ask the same (or more) from a potential buyer. If further deposits are required by the builder along the way, ask for similar deposits from your buyer to feel confident that they are as committed as you are to the purchase. This may give you the feeling of lessened exposure in your transaction.

Your real estate agent can guide you through this process; ask him or her to “structure” counter-offers to buyers so as to minimize your risk. If you look at new home purchase agreements, there are time frames and safeguards in place for all kinds of elements of the agreement. Many new home contracts ask for written preliminary loan approval within the first 30 days of acceptance.

Depending on the escrow time for the offer on your home, it would be wise to do the same. This is one of the most critical aspects of either transaction, because everything hinges upon procurement of a qualified, loan approved buyer. (Ask your agent to explain the importance on “liquidated damages”, so that you know what recourse you have should your buyer fail to perform according to the terms of the contract).

Are you afraid your home will sell so quickly that you may not have time to find just the right new home? Add a clause to your acceptance that gives you a comfortable time frame in which to find a home, such as “offer accepted contingent upon seller’s purchase of another home within the first — days after acceptance of this contract.” I am sure at this point everyone will want to give you advice on where to find a new home! This is also a great protection for you if you are moving to an area unfamiliar to you, where it may take some time to scout all the new home areas.

There are three common scenarios when buying a new home while dealing with selling your existing one. One is to make a completely contingent purchase agreement. This is one in which you sign a contract with the builder to buy their home, but the purchase is wholly dependent upon the sale of your own. The “up” side of this is that you really are risking nothing monetarily. You are also put into the position of “first right of refusal” to any new buyer wishing to purchase the same home. This means that, if the builder is presented with a buyer whose position is stronger than yours (home in escrow, or no home to sell), they must give you a period of time – usually 48-72 hours – to decide if you can remove your contingency on that particular home site. If the down payment for your new home is primarily dependent upon the proceeds from the existing home, you may opt to “let go” of the new home and transfer your deposit to another home in the subdivision, or bow out altogether. The “down” side is that you may lose the home site or home of your dreams. Offers contingent on the sale of a home in a relatively healthy new home market have the potential to send you and your family on an emotional rollercoaster, so prepare yourselves for the ride.

Another consideration is to decide not to sign a purchase agreement on a new home until yours is in escrow. This may limit your time frame to move or find another home, but can give you the confidence you need to proceed with a new home purchase. Most builders consider “contingent upon the close of escrow” to be a fairly sure thing, especially when you and your real estate agent have furnished the builder with written loan approval for your buyer. If this is the route you choose, you may need to consider interim housing, should your new home not be ready for occupancy in time.

The third scenario is applicable only if you have the wherewithal to qualify for a new home purchase without the proceeds from your existing home. That is, you are willing to sign a non-contingent purchase agreement with the builder. You may have your home listed you home through the process of buying the new one, but are willing to do whatever it takes to make the new home purchase proceed without the proceeds from your old one. This may include an eventual change of terms or pricing on your listed home to make it sell, or even the idea of leasing it out until it sells. This can be a scary prospect to many buyers who envision double house payments at some point. Your listing agent is the person to rely upon to communicate recent neighborhood home sale activity, and should be willing to recommend your course of action. Hopefully, you would not have to get of the point of renting it out, unless the prospect of it does not deter you completely.

A real estate expert can guide you through this process as your advocate and advisor. Just remember that the agent is employed by you during the listing period. Communicate all of your concerns to your agent so that he or she can better represent your needs to potential buyers of your home. A good agent is, indeed a safeguard. Even if your agent does not represent you in the purchase of your new home, they will want to help you achieve your objective of a new home purchase if they indeed have your best interests at heart.

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